In memory of Guy Robertson

Guy Robertson tragically passed away on 1 June.

The IPA fondly remembers Guy Robertson, a stalwart of the Scottish advertising industry, Fellow of the IPA, and one of the instrumental figures behind the establishment of NABS Scotland, who tragically passed away on 1 June.

Guy was a real force for change as anyone who worked with him would know especially during his time as Chair of the IPA in Scotland.

The funeral service will be held at 11.30am at Clydebank Crematorium on Friday 12th June, but will be private. There is however an opportunity for many to say their goodbyes outside Kelvinside Academy at 10.45am on the day as the cortege travels to the Crematorium.

Read Mark Gorman’s reflections on Guy’s life.

Memories of Guy

"That wry grin said it all. His somewhat outlandish view on occasions did conceal a hugely generous person who supported the industry in every way, and always had time to help people. He was a true marketing activist, who pressed forward the abilities of the Scottish market and of course Glasgow. He will be sorely missed!"

Giles Brooksbank, former IPA Chair for Scotland

"My great, and only, 'Hun Chum'...a proud Scot, a passionate ad man but most of all a proud Dad and a wonderful friend. Guy was never afraid to share his opinions, forthright and firm, but was always prepared to listen to others. Often irreverent, but always kind...there was a real gentleness behind the livewire relentlessness.

"We met first in Belgrave Square, and then regularly across the cities of the UK with the 97 Club...now the Agency Leaders Forum. All of us in that group now and in the years past have lost a wonderful friend...tragically before his time...but we will remember him fondly and often."

John Keane, Ardmore

"Guy was one of the very few who always left me feeling happier after we met. He had a positive can do attitude and I will never forget his infectious smile. I liked him a lot and I miss him."

John Oldfield, former IPA Membership Director

"Incorrigible. Indignant. Irreducible. Impassioned. Illiberal. Irreverent. Impertinent. Implacable. Infuriating. Irreplaceable.

"Irrefutably, one of a kind."

David Shearer, MediaCom Edinburgh

"I’ve known Guy for over 15 years. We were both Chairs of the IPA in Scotland (at different times) and we were on a number of industry groups together. Guy was a lovely, open, engaging, honest and likeable man. It always struck me that he had a nice element of vulnerability which he was happy to reveal; so you got to see the real Guy. I was lucky to spend many relaxed evenings with Guy, all over the UK. I enjoyed his company immensely, his insight and the inevitable Glaswegian banter. We could talk for hours about pretty much anything, and often I was with him at the end of the evening, both of us still propping up the bar. In recent years I saw a very happy Guy; someone who had found his mojo after some tough years, loving working with his daughter Jemma, and using his vast experience to help clients. He’s been torn away from us far too soon. Words really can’t describe it. It’s left a big gap in our industry in Scotland. Simply tragic."

Ian McAteer, The Union, and former IPA Chair for Scotland

"About 20 years ago I was an art director working at The Union in Edinburgh. It was late one evening when the office phones rang, it was on the nightswitch so anybody could pick it up. Ian McAteer would shout "SOMEONE ANSWER THAT PHONE!!" So I dutifully did.

"I can't remember who they were looking for but it wasn't me. 'Who's that?' 'Guy' I replied. 'Guy Robertson? the caller asked enthusiastically.

"Quite what Guy Robertson would have been doing late at night in the Union is anyone's guess, but they were doubly disappointed I was not him.

"It was a number of years before I managed to properly meet my namesake and he was as much fun as I could have hoped he would be. My thoughts go out to all Guy's friends and family."

Guy Vickerstaff, IPA Chair for Scotland

"Guy was a true industry personality who had a wonderful passion for life. Never without an opinion but always up for a laugh and a good night out, he will be missed and remembered fondly."

Helen Hourston, The Gate Edinburgh

"On behalf of everyone at Leith I would like to express our shock and sadness at the very untimely passing of Guy. Whilst I didn't come across him a lot in a professional context, I would often bump into him at countless industry dos and he always had great chat and a big smile. This industry needs big characters and Guy was certainly one of those and the Scottish agency scene will be a much poorer place without him."

Richard Marsham, Leith

"When I first met Guy in 1990 he certainly made his mark…….on my shin. We were playing football and that was my introduction to his enthusiasm, determination and competitiveness. Post-match was when I also came to appreciate his warmth and generosity.

"Over the years I have always enjoyed his company socially and professionally. He was always willing to help and always had an opinion, which we know he could express very strongly. It is with deep regret that I say I wish I had spent more time with him. Whatever the circumstances I always felt a bit better after speaking to him.

"I know there will be so many others who will share my opinion, he was a great Guy."

Graham Milne, Spirit Media

"I have never written publicly in this way before but then again, there has never been anyone like Guy.

"I first met Guy at an industry event at Hamilton Park Racecourse 28 years ago, and not only did he stand out from the crowd with his immaculate cream linen suit, he was the life and soul of the event and this continued throughout all the years that I have known him.

"Guy held strong views on many subjects and as a vexatious competitor of The Media Shop, we enjoyed many heated debates, often on the subject of client value of a full service agency versus a media independent. These exchanges sometimes took place on the last train back from Edinburgh events, with Guy giving up the comfort of his first class seat to join me in economy class.

"Across 28 years, Guy moved from being a competitor, to a co-conspirator, to a friend, but he always remained true to himself – argumentative, generous and loyal. Many in the industry will be thinking ‘Guy was my friend too’ - that was the impact he had and the affection in which he was held.

"This week, I told Guy’s daughter Jemma how incredibly popular her dad was and like a scene from the movie Spartacus, she will hear a chorus ‘No, I am Guy’s friend’ echo for a long time to come. "

Caroline McGrath, The Media Shop Scotland

Last updated 10 June 2020